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    No Matter How You Built Your Cloud…

    Racquel Yerbury

    No matter how you built your cloud—no matter what tools or services you’ve used to provision an application’s infrastructure—you can migrate existing workloads to Fugue easily and securely with no downtime. At AWS re:Invent this week, November 27 - December 1, test out Fugue’s automated infrastructure governance with our team at booth 1600 or explore Fugue’s new migration and enhanced compliance capabilities at www.fugue.co/migrate . By migrating to Fugue, enterprises, agencies, and DevSecOps teams in any organization centralize their control and visibility of systems running in the cloud, while accelerating secure deployments and updates. Human error—typical with scaled, enterprise infrastructure and costly in dollars and consumer trust—is drastically reduced since Fugue highlights...

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    Get Your Cloud, See Your Cloud—A Full View with Fugue

    Racquel Yerbury

    One of the most difficult things to understand about the cloud is the shape and extent of your overall application in it, whether you’re manually building your app’s infrastructure using the AWS Console or CLI, or scripting it using CloudFormation or another provisioning tool. Solutions architects, developers, and systems administrators make countless diagrams for customers and internal teams trying to provide a consumable, accurate view of what’s running or what a team would like to deploy. We’ve all learned the hard way that doing this manually is both error prone and quickly out of date. Fugue’s Composer, part of the original vision of Fugue, maps your application’s cloud infrastructure with automated, interactive diagrams that show your whole system in real time and the...

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    Fugue Addresses Cloud's “Undifferentiated Heavy Lifting”

    Racquel Yerbury

    Twenty minutes or two weeks to spin up your new applications and new product features? Automated care and feeding of infrastructure that requires minimal human intervention or bespoke care and feeding that requires continual attention? The choice seems pretty obvious. Back in 2006, Jeff Bezos was building Amazon Web Services (AWS) to solve a core problem for businesses: undifferentiated heavy lifting. Getting great ideas and applications to market fast is key in holding a competitive edge. If you transform parts of the IT pipeline that require a lot of time, effort, and money—the same parts that every business has to contend with—into fast, easy-to-use, efficient parts, you win. Or, at least, you’re a few laps ahead. Bezos, with foresight to grow AWS into what’s now the largest cloud...

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    Validations Give Government Agencies Speed and Certainty in the Cloud

    Racquel Yerbury

    Fugue now supports the Amazon Web Services (AWS) GovCloud region, which means federal agencies, like enterprises, can automate operations in the cloud fast, while simultaneously meeting regulatory demands. Fugue deployments start with powerful, but easy-to-understand code declarations in a composition that governs a system’s infrastructure. By including select libraries in that composition with simple import statements, a particular agency’s compliance regime gets integrated from the start. This kind of fully realized policy-as-code provides a scalable protocol for agency cloud ops and increases speed to mission. The Power Behind Policy-as-Code The power behind policy-as-code lies in validations. Fugue ships with some common validations, but also enables agencies and businesses to...

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    Why Write a Book?

    Racquel Yerbury

    “It worked on my laptop!” Seven weeks into your latest project, you’ve gotten to the point where management wants a demo. Your first spike was run from a node server that you ran on your laptop. When another developer joined, you moved the environment to Vagrant so you could share an image. When the third and fourth bodies were assigned, you decided to save time by automating the installation with Chef. You’ve all been collaborating effectively for weeks and now you need to put it out on a cloud provider to give your stakeholders access. Your cloud infrastructure was set up by a different team with domain expertise on the platform. Sadly, that did not confer upon them a psychic ability to anticipate the networking needs of your Riak cluster. Nor did it allow them to anticipate...

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    A Holiday Season Kickoff at AWS re:Invent 2016 — Gifts From the Cloud

    Racquel Yerbury

    We’re a couple of weeks out of re:Invent and its dizzying buzz—the slew of service and feature announcements, the industry tracks and community meetings, the Mini Cons, the integration and how-to session deep dives, the intensive networking, the mall of sponsors with every manner of product presentation … even festive bling from the ever-present registration DJ. We’ve had some time to digest what we saw and learned this time around and to think about a few of the more compelling offerings. In this post, we’re not going to recap the full laundry list of new services introduced or feature enhancements (many especially targeted at enterprise). Good overviews are abundant; here are ones from InfoQ, VentureBeat, and Rackspace. Instead, let’s zero in on a handful of provocative...

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    Regions Beyond Regions: Global Cloud Infrastructure Expansions

    Racquel Yerbury

    Think about the cloud as a massive global computer . That paradigm—with developers and users managing hyperscale cloud services within its framework—means tapping into a kind of pattern recognition. Cloud data centers, substations, and fiber are physical components of a cloud motherboard. Genuine cloud operating systems like Fugue can be built. Cloud processes can be represented with a pid equivalent. And so on. This year, 2016, is a year of expansion. Below, you see an aggregate mapping of a wide swath of Earth’s cloud “hardware”—installed by Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud Platform, and IBM/Softlayer. All of it, arguably, can be and eventually will be manipulated as parts of the same machine. Shown are 78 global regions with cloud data centers for the four...

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    Practical Recursion Schemes at PragPub

    Racquel Yerbury

    Jared Tobin is one of our consultants at fugue.co —he's a programmer and researcher based out of Auckland, New Zealand. Jared's article in this month's issue of PragPub, The Pragmatic Bookshelf's magazine affiliation, is a helpful read if you're interested in functional programming and Haskell in particular. Check out "Practical Recursion Schemes" here . Recursion schemes are simple, composable combinators that automate traversing nested data structures. They are a powerful abstraction that can be implemented in any language with first-class functions. Jared explores various schemes and their applications using Haskell, but the lessons here can be applied in Clojure or any true functional language. The article details a number of recursion scheme examples. One of them is a...

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    What's A Fugue?

    Racquel Yerbury

    Our product, now in beta release , is called Fugue. It's a distinctive word. And, unless you're a musician, it's probably not a part of your standard vocabulary. This video blog is solely about that word—fugue—and its primary meaning in music. Metaphors are some of the most powerful tools we have in language for illustrating what's in our minds: how an innovation might work, what patterns in art and nature might be useful in solving a particular problem, which traditional parameters might we break through to, well, have a breakthrough. We take metaphors seriously as brainstorming points and as a place to start philosophically. At 10,000 feet, the fugue, as a form in music, meshes with a fundamental aspect of the computing architecture we're creating. For more information, check out CEO...

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    March, Hypatia, and a Case for Optimism in Tech Culture

    Racquel Yerbury

    March 8 was International Women's Day . Some celebrated. Some scoffed. Some lives are so tough that calendars mean little. In the U.S., a Presidential Proclamation highlights the entire month of March; it's an eloquent document with compelling reminders of sacrifices made, achievements earned, brutalities endured, present and past, by women. The genderless, luminous being attached to my beautifully gendered identity and sexed body laments the necessity of these kinds of declarations. But, I would use any tool, including "March," to spell out history and reality in the public forum, in a persistent attempt to stop vicious patterns from repeating themselves. I remain certain that an honorable alien trying to understand humanity, Googling rape statistics alone (much less employment...

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